Lift Up Our Eyes

There’s a song that’s just been released by Third Day that I just can’t seem to get away from. It seems like every time I turn the radio on – which isn’t very often – I keep hearing the same line of lyrics, “salvation is coming.”

Finally, after about a week of not hearing the full song I decided to YouTube it. I found out it’s not called “salvation is coming” like I thought it was, because of course that was the only line of the lyrics I ever seem to hear, but it’s actually called “Lift Up Your Face”. I also figured out that the line of lyrics I was listening to was actually “salvation is calling” instead of “salvation is coming”. Go figure.

It’s  amazing what you learn on YouTube, but, be that as it may, it’s a great song and worth a listen.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIkzb4quruA&fs=1&hl=en_US]

Because I’ve heard this song so much, it got me thinking about salvation. Part of the Christian culture in the U.S. is a focus on the time and date that we got “saved”, meaning when did each of us first accept Christ’s sacrifice for our sins and enter into a relationship with Him.

Sometimes I think we focus on this so much that we forget that salvation is a daily, sometimes hourly, sometimes even by the minute process. We are always in the desperate need of being saved, maybe not from the jaws of death which is a life lived without God like we were before we first believed, but from ourselves and all we still drag around that hinders us in our relationship with Him.

Part of that daily salvation is lifting up our eyes to the only one who can help us in our times of need, and has the ability to forgive us when we repent and return to Him sometimes for the millionth time.

In scripture there are many references to lifting up our eyes and how God uses that action to give us life. This action of lifting up our eyes helps to show us where we stand and from Whom our help comes.

The Israelites who chose to looked up at the bronze snake that Moses made as God commanded and recovered from poisonous snake bites in Numbers 21. King Nebuchadnezzar looked up to the Lord and regained his sanity after living like an animal for seven years as a punishment for his pride and arrogance in Daniel 4. And, these are just a couple of instances of this concept of people lifting up their eyes that we see in scripture.

In the Psalms, King David, a man after God’s own heart, questioned where his help came from. He looked to the hills and probably saw the Ashera poles set there as places of worship to other gods and realized his help did not come from those things. He had to look higher than the hills, up to the heavens themselves, where his God, the only one, lives.

David’s life is a study in the need to be saved. The continual need for salvation. He always seemed to have something he needed to be saved from, whether it was enemies from outside his house or inside of it, or from his own decisions that led to less than desirable consequences.

Just like us. Sometimes the things we need to be saved from have more to do with others, their decisions and how those decisions impact our lived than ourselves. Yet, there are other times when we need to be saved from ourselves, our own decisions and where they’ve led us.

Our God is a saving God. He doesn’t just save us once when we accept Christ as our Messiah, then leave us alone to fend for ourselves. He is constantly saving us. Salvation is here and it is coming from the only one who loves us enough to stand by us and has the power and authority to make that salvation a reality.

“I raise my eyes towards the mountains. Where will my help come from? My help comes from the LORD, the Maker of heaven and earth.”

Psalm 121:1-2

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